Burgee Etiquette

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Burgee Etiquette

John Lidstone 1503
This post was updated on .
Firstly I'd like to introduce myself to you all. I sail my 19ft 8in trimaran from a drying mooring near Saltash, Cornwall.
Now my question:- Preparing my boat for the season has me wondering about the correct position for my DCA burgee. I'm sure this must have been covered before but.....
Is the DCA burgee really a "burgee" or a "house flag"?
A quick look at the RYA guidance shows that "Burgees" (which signify club membership) should be flown from the masthead or if this spot is occupied by a wind vane then the starboard spreader/shroud could be used. "House flags" (which signify membership of an association) should not be at the masthead or starboard spreader but should be flown from the port spreader/shroud.
It seems to me that it has to be the port spreader/shroud. Any offers?

John
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Tom Hart 2280
I agree, John, particularly if you are also a member of a club.
Tom. Wayfarer and Michalak Twixt. Solent.
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Roger Barnes 936
The DCA burgee should be in the senior position at the top of the mast. If you must fly other club flags, they can be flown in the second most senior position at the starboard spreaders. If due to laziness or some physical obstruction you really cannot put the DCA burgee at the top of the mast, then it can be flown to starboard, but in that case any other club flags must then be in the third most senior position to port.

This is official. No further arguments will be countenanced. Immediate action is required of all members.

By Presidential Decree, today 11 April 2016.


On 11 Apr 2016, at 09:34, Tom Hart 2280 [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

I agree, John, particularly if you are also a member of a club.
Tom. Wayfarer and building Michalak Twixt. Solent.



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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Diane Tucker3319
In reply to this post by John Lidstone 1503
I would like to purchase a DCA BURGEE. But how?
Many thanks,
Diane Tucker #3319
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

John Lidstone 1503
Hi Diane,

Get one via DCA shop (Elizabeth Baker) See inside front cover of "Dinghy Cruising" for contact details. I'm not sure but I think there may be two sizes available.
Send her a cheque payable to "Dinghy Cruising Association" quoting your membership number and she will post it to you.

Regards

John
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Paul Holdsworth 3279
This may seem silly (no, really!) but why two sizes? Is bigger better? Is this an extrovert/shrinking violet thing? Would a biggun flop down and get in the way on my sixteen footer? How do we choose?
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Keith Muscott 1516
Administrator
Hi Paul,

As a pal of mine, John, makes the burgees for Liz I am able to recall this decision being made, and being a part of making it. I sketched the original drawings he works from.

The smaller size is intended for Mirrors and the like, with the larger size for ±14-footers and bigger. This may seem odd in conversation, but they look right on the boats. Honest.

You need the larger size, which looks right on my Cruz (14ft 7ins over deck). It also looks fine on top of the bookshelves in my hall when it is not out and about taking the air.

There is no DCA etiquette concerning this: in the final analysis you choose according to personal taste or practicality. As the Cruz burgee has a tough GRP rod for its mini flagstaff, I also jam it into the rudder bearing on my 13ft kayak and tie it off, where it survives very well.

Keith




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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Paul Holdsworth 3279
Thanks Keith - that sorts that out.
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Elizabeth Baker
In reply to this post by Paul Holdsworth 3279
As present manager of the DCA SHOP, I stock the two sizes made by our friend John Knox because some people prefer the smaller size. When I first took over the shop we only had the large sized burgees, made in cotton. Personally I prefer the larger size because they show-up better. Even some Mirror sailors can be seen flying this larger burgee. I fly mine from the top of my mast because I like to use it as a burgee - ie an indication of wind direction, but as it sometimes it gets wrapped around the span to the gaff, it might be better to use the smaller one. Some people seem unable to work-out how to get it to the  top of the mast, so instead tie it to the shrouds, but then it cannot be seen through the sail, unless you have a burgee on each shroud. I can't do that as my Cormorant has no shrouds. The DCA burgee comes without a mast, as it would be very difficult and expensive to post with mast attached, but it does have two loops which members can use, if wished, to attach it to the shrouds. To create a burgee mast, you can either mount it on a stick of bamboo, a knitting needle, or buy a racing burgee from a yacht chandlers, cut-off the flag which is on there and instead sew on the DCA one. As with our DCA burgees, racing burgees come in two sizes, large or small, so you can match your stick to the size of your burgee. I prefer those with a wind vane attached, and I sew a portion of the top of the burgee to the wind vane, using a herringbone stitch and taking the thread around the spar each time. It only takes a few moments to do. The same stick can be used for your new burgee once the old one has worn-out; there is no need to buy another unless it is bent or broken.

Liz
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Paul Holdsworth 3279
Thanks Elizabeth - you've answered questions I hasn't asked but should have! I'll get my order in.
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Keith Muscott 1516
Administrator
As Liz mentions in her DCA Shop advert, the bottom of the hem on the luff of the burgee is stitched but left open to admit your flagstaff of bamboo, aluminium walking pole section, GRP rod from B&Q, or whatever, which slides neatly up inside to the closed top. This does not get in the way of the lower stitched loop that takes the bottom lanyard if you wish to use the two loops to tie the burgee off on a shroud at some point (when you've broken the staff, mid-rally?).

I remember poring over his sewing machine with him while we sorted that one out!

The material is spinnaker quality and the thread is very strong – sailmaking quality. Both come from Point North Pro Fabric.

Keith
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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Roger Barnes 936
The main thing to remember with burgee etiquette is that, like all yacht club burgees, the DCA burgee cannot be flown when the club member is not on board. It must be lowered every time. It should also be lowered at sunset and raised again at sunrise. The times of these are given in the almanac. I cannot express how cruel and swift the punishment is for members who are found to break these rules.


On 28 May 2016, at 17:29, Keith Muscott 1516 [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

As Liz mentions in her DCA Shop advert, the bottom of the hem on the luff of the burgee is stitched but left open to admit your flagstaff of bamboo, aluminium walking pole section, GRP rod from B&Q, or whatever, which slides neatly up inside to the closed top. This does not get in the way of the lower stitched loop that takes the bottom lanyard if you wish to use the two loops to tie the burgee off on a shroud at some point (when you've broken the staff, mid-rally?).

I remember poring over his sewing machine with him while we sorted that one out!

The material is spinnaker quality and the thread is very strong – sailmaking quality. Both come from Point North Pro Fabric.

Keith


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Roger Barnes
President
Dinghy Cruising Association

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Re: Burgee Etiquette

Keith Muscott 1516
Administrator
I heard it involves the miscreant being tied transversely across the hull underwater while she settles on the mud. So not so swift ...
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