Cockpit tents

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Cockpit tents

Diane Tucker3319
Hello! I am about to make a tent for my Jim Michalak Lady Bug. I will try to put up a picture. I am wondering how to find a thread on the DCA Forum about this topic. I would also like to hear your collective words of wisdom, especially if there is no specific thread. Thank you very much.
(I've tried to do the photo-no luck, sorry. I am a techno-idiot.)
Diane Tucker
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RE: Cockpit tents

John Lidstone 1503
Hello Diane
 
There are many ways of doing it with lots of room for personal preference so you won't get the same answer from anyone! There has been a lot written about how to do it in the DCA Quarterly mag and other books on the subject. But to get you started:-
I found photos of the Lady Bug on the net and you have a locker lid in the deck in front of the mast, no side decks, a nice low seating position with good back support at gunnel height.
You will want access to the locker from inside the tent. So your tent will start on deck forward of the locker and slope back to the mast where there needs to be a wrap-around sleeve to minimise rain trickling down the mast (can't be stopped entirely). The join at the side of the tent could be closed by a heavy zip, Velcro or lacing (in order of my preference).
The tent will hook under the outside of the gunnels with (I say) elastic loops onto some kind of non-snagging hook. I have used plastic mushrooms sold for trailer tarps. you need to be able to do it from sitting in the boat.
You have a very stable boat so you would want full width sitting headroom so that you can make use of your side benches. The ways of doing this are formed wooden or alum tube "coat hangers" hung from the boom, rigid/flexible hoops standing on the side benches or socketed into the gunnel or using your spars braced to push out the sloping sides of the tent. Some people will say just have sloping sides for greater simplicity. It does restrict space but as yours is a large boat you may find it ok.
Material, I say, should be white, light grey or cream so you can see what you're doing inside and to keep the temperature down in the sun. Some are happy with polytarp which crackles in the least wind and collects condensation. I say that you are going to spend a lot of effort in making the thing so invest in some decent awning material. Not too thick so that you can fold it up small.
It is nice to have small windows to see out. Bigger ones risk being damaged when screwed up and lose privacy. Or go for curtains - your choice.
I hope this helps you think about what you want from your tent and provokes some other responses.
 
Best wishes
John 
 

Date: Sun, 15 May 2016 05:21:25 -0700
From: [hidden email]
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Cockpit tents

Hello! I am about to make a tent for my Jim Michalak Lady Bug. I will try to put up a picture. I am wondering how to find a thread on the DCA Forum about this topic. I would also like to hear your collective words of wisdom, especially if there is no specific thread. Thank you very much.
(I've tried to do the photo-no luck, sorry. I am a techno-idiot.)
Diane Tucker


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/Cockpit-tents-tp390.html
To start a new topic under Flotsam & Jetsam: Everything else dinghy cruising, email [hidden email]
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NAML
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Re: Cockpit tents

Frank San Miguel 3252
In reply to this post by Diane Tucker3319
Here's how I made a cockpit tent for Michalak AF3.  Unfortunately, I switched boats before I got to try it out.

http://sail.fsanmiguel.com/search?q=tent

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Re: Cockpit tents

John Sharpe 2985
Here's a video of setting up my boat and it includes a section in the middle showing my tent arrangement:

https://youtu.be/rT4Ub3wWT9o

Regards

John
John Sharpe & Michy-Lou.
Loving Sailing
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Re: Cockpit tents

Steve Parke 2986
In reply to this post by Diane Tucker3319
I made mine from cheap tarp and some plumbing pipe. It is very basic but works. I tie a line between the two masts and the tarp goes over that and gets tied off at each mast. The sides clip to hooks under the rubbing strikes. A video of its rapid assembly is here
https://youtu.be/33AgMhrmJnI

If you search my other videos, there is one of it being used in very wet weather last year in Falmouth. There were some leaks! But then I also sleep inside a gortex bivvy bag beneath the tarp so I don't tend to get wet during the night, just inthe morning when moving about a little. Condensation isn't so much of a problem as I leave each end slightly open.

It's basic. It works too point. One day I will invest in a properly made fitted one
Steve
Steve
Arwen's Meanderings
www.arwensmeanderings.blogspot.com
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Re: Cockpit tents

Tom Hart 2280
In reply to this post by John Sharpe 2985
Impressive,  John!  How do you locate the tops of the hoops, please?
Tom. Wayfarer and Michalak Twixt. Solent.
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Re: Cockpit tents

Elizabeth Baker
In reply to this post by Diane Tucker3319
    Hello Diane,
    The tent I use on my 12' 6" Cormorant dinghy is a cotton/terylene mixture. I prefer cotton
    canvas to nylon because you get less bother with condensation. It is a simple tent slung over
    my boom with a couple of triangular flaps which extend forward of the mast and lace
    together to keep the wind out, but can be opened to gain access to the anchor. The tent is
    closed by similar flaps at the rear end which can be laced-up, but which I usually have open
    so I can fold the tent back in fine weather, while the forward end keeps me sheltered from the
    wind - this assuming you are anchored and the boat is lying head-to-wind. My tent has a deep
    hem all along the bottom edge, split into three sections, into which I slide the oars. The
    weight of the oars are usually sufficient to hold the sides down, except in very strong winds,
    when I also tie them down to the sides of the boat. I have two large polythene windows in the
    sides, but as John Lidstone says, these were a mistake as they tend to crack when the tent is
    folded. Smaller windows would be better. However, this tent has served me well on two
    separate boats over the last 40 year as is still working well. It's amazing how it keeps me dry
    and warm on cold, windy or wet nights. The boom can be supported with a topping lift, but I
    use a boom crutch because with a topping-lift the boom can swing about beneath the tent if
    the water is choppy, which could wear-out the canvas over time, and with a boom crutch it is
    easier to get the boom at the correct height.

Hoops are useful as they stop the sides of the tent flopping-in on you and give you more headroom. Mine are made from flexible plastic curtain track or stiff, flexible plastic water pipe. They are inserted once the tent is up and go up over the boom, and the ends slot into special pockets sewn near the hem of the tent.

Tip: While designing your tent, make sure you can erect in from within the boat, because you won't be able to walk around it when you are at anchor. It's also a good idea to make a preliminary tent out of cheap fabric such as polytarp, and try camping in that a couple of times, to save getting it wrong once you are working with better quality and more expensive fabric.

I have attached some photos to give you an idea of how it looks. Good luck!

   

   

The boom crutch also makes a useful place to store your wellies if you want to keep the mud out of your tent!
    The boom crutch can also be used as a welly hanger! Useful when you want to keep muddy
    wellies outside the tent."/>

    I have taken photos of the tent flap lacing arrangement as well, but regret I can't find those.
    Must take some more next time I am sailing.

    Liz
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Re: Cockpit tents

Diane Tucker3319
Dear Liz,
I have been fiddling around with the making of a tent. I love your Wellie hangers. That crutch is quite nice. I am using one, but I did not build it myself. The next one I will build and it will be like yours.i am going to out windows in, I think. And since my oars are very light I am going to go with sew-on rings that will slip over hooks I have put under th gunnels. My daughter is very keen to come camping. Our tent is in three sections, a white section flanked by yellow sections on either side. The material is canvas, and I will add some waterproofing to it. I am going to take your suggestion on the hoop. Good thinking! I fashioned a flag halyard today and my little burgee was very happy up there. So was I, just looking at it.
Many warm regards,
Diane
----- Original Message -----
From: Elizabeth Baker [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]>
To: Diane Tucker3319 <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sat, 28 May 2016 14:58:29 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Cockpit tents



    Hello Diane,
    The tent I use on my 12' 6" Cormorant dinghy is a cotton/terylene
mixture. I prefer cotton
    canvas to nylon because you get less bother with condensation. It is a
simple tent slung over
    my boom with a couple of triangular flaps which extend forward of the
mast and lace
    together to keep the wind out, but can be opened to gain access to the
anchor. The tent is
    closed by similar flaps at the rear end which can be laced-up, but which
I usually have open
    so I can fold the tent back in fine weather, while the forward end keeps
me sheltered from the
    wind - this assuming you are anchored and the boat is lying
head-to-wind. My tent has a deep
    hem all along the bottom edge, split into three sections, into which I
slide the oars. The
    weight of the oars are usually sufficient to hold the sides down, except
in very strong winds,
    when I also tie them down to the sides of the boat. I have two large
polythene windows in the
    sides, but as John Lidstone says, these were a mistake as they tend to
crack when the tent is
    folded. Smaller windows would be better. However, this tent has served
me well on two
    separate boats over the last 40 year as is still working well. It's
amazing how it keeps me dry
    and warm on cold, windy or wet nights. The boom can be supported with a
topping lift, but I
    use a boom crutch because with a topping-lift the boom can swing about
beneath the tent if
    the water is choppy, which could wear-out the canvas over time, and with
a boom crutch it is
    easier to get the boom at the correct height.

Hoops are useful as they stop the sides of the tent flopping-in on you and
give you more headroom. Mine are made from flexible plastic curtain track or
stiff, flexible plastic water pipe. They are inserted once the tent is up
and go up over the boom, and the ends slot into special pockets sewn near
the hem of the tent.

Tip: While designing your tent, make sure you can erect in from within the
boat, because you won't be able to walk around it when you are at anchor.
It's also a good idea to make a preliminary tent out of cheap fabric such as
polytarp, and try camping in that a couple of times, to save getting it
wrong once you are working with better quality and more expensive fabric.

I have attached some photos to give you an idea of how it looks. Good luck!

   
<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/TESSA_WITH_TENT_%28FROM_ASTERN%29.jpg>

   
<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/Tessa_-_cockpit_with_tent.jpg>

<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/Tessas_welly_hanger.jpg>
    The boom crutch can also be used as a welly hanger! Useful when you want
to keep muddy
    wellies outside the tent."/>

    I have taken photos of the tent flap lacing arrangement as well, but
regret I can't find those.
    Must take some more next time I am sailing.

    Liz



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Re: Cockpit tents

Roger Barnes 936
Privacy is a problem if you have windows - unless you curtain them. I find it is perfectly light enough inside a light coloured tent, without windows. My present tent is coloured light tan. I would avoid dark green or blue. 

From Roger Barnes by mobile

On 29 May 2016, at 03:10, Diane Tucker3319 [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Dear Liz,
I have been fiddling around with the making of a tent. I love your Wellie hangers. That crutch is quite nice. I am using one, but I did not build it myself. The next one I will build and it will be like yours.i am going to out windows in, I think. And since my oars are very light I am going to go with sew-on rings that will slip over hooks I have put under th gunnels. My daughter is very keen to come camping. Our tent is in three sections, a white section flanked by yellow sections on either side. The material is canvas, and I will add some waterproofing to it. I am going to take your suggestion on the hoop. Good thinking! I fashioned a flag halyard today and my little burgee was very happy up there. So was I, just looking at it.
Many warm regards,
Diane
----- Original Message -----
From: Elizabeth Baker [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]>
To: Diane Tucker3319 <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sat, 28 May 2016 14:58:29 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: Re: Cockpit tents



    Hello Diane,
    The tent I use on my 12' 6" Cormorant dinghy is a cotton/terylene
mixture. I prefer cotton
    canvas to nylon because you get less bother with condensation. It is a
simple tent slung over
    my boom with a couple of triangular flaps which extend forward of the
mast and lace
    together to keep the wind out, but can be opened to gain access to the
anchor. The tent is
    closed by similar flaps at the rear end which can be laced-up, but which
I usually have open
    so I can fold the tent back in fine weather, while the forward end keeps
me sheltered from the
    wind - this assuming you are anchored and the boat is lying
head-to-wind. My tent has a deep
    hem all along the bottom edge, split into three sections, into which I
slide the oars. The
    weight of the oars are usually sufficient to hold the sides down, except
in very strong winds,
    when I also tie them down to the sides of the boat. I have two large
polythene windows in the
    sides, but as John Lidstone says, these were a mistake as they tend to
crack when the tent is
    folded. Smaller windows would be better. However, this tent has served
me well on two
    separate boats over the last 40 year as is still working well. It's
amazing how it keeps me dry
    and warm on cold, windy or wet nights. The boom can be supported with a
topping lift, but I
    use a boom crutch because with a topping-lift the boom can swing about
beneath the tent if
    the water is choppy, which could wear-out the canvas over time, and with
a boom crutch it is
    easier to get the boom at the correct height.

Hoops are useful as they stop the sides of the tent flopping-in on you and
give you more headroom. Mine are made from flexible plastic curtain track or
stiff, flexible plastic water pipe. They are inserted once the tent is up
and go up over the boom, and the ends slot into special pockets sewn near
the hem of the tent.

Tip: While designing your tent, make sure you can erect in from within the
boat, because you won't be able to walk around it when you are at anchor.
It's also a good idea to make a preliminary tent out of cheap fabric such as
polytarp, and try camping in that a couple of times, to save getting it
wrong once you are working with better quality and more expensive fabric.

I have attached some photos to give you an idea of how it looks. Good luck!

   
<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/TESSA_WITH_TENT_%28FROM_ASTERN%29.jpg>

   
<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/Tessa_-_cockpit_with_tent.jpg>

<http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/file/n429/Tessas_welly_hanger.jpg>
    The boom crutch can also be used as a welly hanger! Useful when you want
to keep muddy
    wellies outside the tent."/>

    I have taken photos of the tent flap lacing arrangement as well, but
regret I can't find those.
    Must take some more next time I am sailing.

    Liz



_______________________________________________
If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://forum.dinghycruising.org.uk/Cockpit-tents-tp390p429.html

To unsubscribe from Cockpit tents, visit


To start a new topic under Flotsam & Jetsam: Everything else dinghy cruising, email [hidden email]
To unsubscribe from DCA Forum, click here.
NAML
Roger Barnes
President
Dinghy Cruising Association

president@dinghycruising.org.uk
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Re: Cockpit tents

Elizabeth Baker
In reply to this post by Diane Tucker3319
Hello Diane,
I have shortened my boom crutch since that photo was taken, as it was too long and difficult to stow. You just need to make sure the Vee is big enough to securely hold the boom. I can still use it to hang my wellies on. I used to use a stainless steel bolt and butterfly nut to act as a hinge, but the nut used to work loose while towing or sailing, drop out and get lost, so now I just use a piece of cord through the two holes, knotted on either side to stop it sliding through, and when setting-up, lash the remaining cord around the two planks to hold them securely together.
Liz