Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

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Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Brian Chislett 2642
Are there any rules and regulations to comply with if you want to launch and sail  a dinghy or small trailer sailer in the Lake District or the Broads?
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Peter Brooks 3064
Hi
You need a licence to sail on the broads (details on their website). Cost depends on size of boat, and whether you have a motor or not. The 'Licence' consists of an adhesive patch which is difficult to remove.
Hope this helps,
Peter Brooks.
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Roger Barnes 936
There are no licenses required to sail on the main lakes in the Lake District, except if you want to put a motorised boat on Windermere (including a dinghy with an outboard) when you need to register and display a number - obtainable from the National Park. Otherwise you just launch - although many launching sites require a fee of course. I never bother with an outboard so I don't know the process for obtaining the Windermere registration number, and cannot imagine why anyone would want to put a motorised boat on any of the English lakes anyway. But perhaps that's just me!


On 22 Sep 2017, at 09:09, Peter Brooks 3064 [via DCA Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi
You need a licence to sail on the broads (details on their website). Cost depends on size of boat, and whether you have a motor or not. The 'Licence' consists of an adhesive patch which is difficult to remove.
Hope this helps,
Peter Brooks.


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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Roy Clements 3039
In reply to this post by Brian Chislett 2642
Hi there,

maps available from the Tourist Office/Lake information Centres/Lake District National Park... indicate whether the shoreline and launch sites are private or public

Coniston Hall Campsite has direct access to the lake and their shoreline for a fee, but no vehicles are allowed onto the lake edge there. Boats/trailers need to be light enough to manhandle.

Waterside Campsite on Ullswater also has direct access to the lake, again for a fee, where a vehicle can be used for launching

As far as I'm aware, carried craft such as Kayaks and inflatables don't attract a fee, but it's still worth checking whether the shorelines are private, as you may be challenged if landing for a lunch stop

You obviously pay for the campsites, but they do offer a higher level of security when leaving car/trailer combinations near slipways

Roy
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Michael Wilkinson 3461
I visited the Lake Warden's office only this week.  There is an office a mile or so south of Bowness on Windermere.  There's a marina, slipway and good parking for trailers.

Rules are: no registration or fee to use a non-powered craft on the lake.

An auxiliary electric outboard that you hope never to use but just have for emergencies counts as power, but he said this with a nod and a wink.

Any powered craft, you pay a registration fee for the year and you have to display a number.  The combined fee is quite a lot but lasts all year.

Some free slips are available.  The one south of Bowness is free if you don't launch using your vehicle and I think he said £12 if you do use your vehicle.  There is a £10 all day parking charge, though.
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Mark D
We are thinking of breaking our drive from Devon to Fort William for the Sail Caledonia Raid with a couple of nights in the Lake District in May.  We will be trailing our Swallow Bayraider.

I have never sailed in the Lakes.

If you were to pick one of the Lake District Lakes for two days of day sailing while staying ashore (preferably waterfront accommodation) which lake would it be and why?

Thanks
Mark
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Michael Wilkinson 3461
If you have never sailed in the lakes before, then there must be two good days' sailing for you in any of the 4 big ones.  Crikey, we once joined a sailing club where the same people chased each other around a pond several times every weekend, and they thought it was wonderful fun. ;)

Windermere is the biggest and most varied, with bays, headlands, islands and straits between, with various marinas, and towns and pubs at various places along the shore.  If a strong wind is blowing along the lake, it can get quite choppy.

Coniston is less crowded, less interestingly shaped, but with beautiful mountain scenery.  It has free launching, no need to register.  There is accommodation nearby, as well as cafés and pubs.  It also boasts the island that inspired Wild Cat Island in Swallows and Amazons.

Ullswater has its adherents.  I don't know the lake, but it does have plenty of sailing on it.

That leaves Derwent Water, which I have seen but not boated on.  I would expect it to be pleasant for a day's sailing, but more limited than the other 3.

Other lakes are available.

Given the right weather, you will have fun.

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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

John Hughes 2457
In reply to this post by Mark D
It is impossible to say whether any lake is better than any other. Your enjoyment will depend on your experiences of the day, which will depend on a multitude of factors. All the lakes are pretty. You can have delightful days sailing on all of them. And they all have different character. Ullswater scenically is probably the most spectacular. Windermere is the biggest, has variety, and is also the busiest. Derwentwater is small, immensely charming, and shallow. Coniston Water is ideal for speed trials but also has its attractions. Bassenthwaite Lake has ospreys, and probably you need temporary sailing club membership to sail there. How much you enjoy your day will depend on the company you sail with, the people you meet, and the weather.
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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Andy Biggs 3272
In reply to this post by Mark D
Hi - suggest you look at Ullswater, as it is the easiest to access as you head north up the M6, use J40.

Options to launch:

Temporary membership at Ullswater YC - welcoming, good club house etc
Park Foot campsite has a slip on site
Waterside campsite has a slip - touch smaller than Park Foot
Glenridding Sailing Centre - welcoming and tractor launch etc
Ullswater Marine, has holiday/temporary moorings etc

Ullswater is long - has islands and also not straight ! - more interesting, so can the wind be! No licence needed. A good landing place is Aira Point - café and toilets.

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Re: Lake District and The Broads-Rules and regulations??

Jerry Evans 2510
In reply to this post by Brian Chislett 2642
Brian, there are no restrictions, apart from a speed limit, on Derwentwater. It is easily accessed from M6 at J40, westwards for about 20 miles. Make for Derwentwater Marina, or Nichol End Marine. One can park car and trailer, there are showers and toilets. The Caravan and Camping Club site near Keswick offers full facilities and access to the water on site for an extra charge.
For Swallows and Amazons type fun, a largish Island to land on and anchor almost anywhere, Derwentwater is my recommendation. For small craft that can be carried over a low boulder barrier at the National Trust lakeside car park at Kettlewell, is one I have used for My Mirror, sailboard and inflateables. My favourite Lakeland lake. (As I live locally, I may be able to help with further info etc?)
Jerry.